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Rhythm of Love: In conversation with Nourhe Khate

By   /  May 16, 2019  /  Comments Off on Rhythm of Love: In conversation with Nourhe Khate

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The multi talented Nourhe Khate is a violinist and guitarist who plays both instruments with equal passion. Khate’s relationship with the violin was introduced to him by his parents, which he says he didn’t have any enthusiasm for in the beginning. But the mystery of learning something new drew him closer to the violin.

Khate is also the guitarist of the band Papersky. The young artist has a collection of impressive accolades including Winning the David Menezes National Violin Competition in 2014, and he even played alongside Nise Meruno at the wedding of Nisha Ambani and Anand Piramal.

Eastern Mirror caught up with the promising artist for insight into his exciting musical journey, read on to know more!

 

Eastern Mirror: When did you first pick up the violin and why?

Nourhe Khate: I started my violin learning journey when I was 8 years old. It was my parents who chose the violin for me. I still remember the day they came home and asked me whether I would like to learn the Violin, I didn’t particularly have any idea about the violin neither did I have any deep desire to learn it as an 8 year old, but I guess it was the mystery of learning something new that got me started.

 

Eastern Mirror: Did you have a mentor or any training along your journey?

Nourhe Khate: Yes I did have many mentors along the way. I initially studied the violin under Keneilenyü, R. Kevichüsa and Arun Rozario. Then later, I went on to study under the virtuoso Lana Trotovsek during my studies in Trinity Laban Conservatoire of Music.

 

Eastern Mirror: Can you tell us what you love about the violin and what the challenges are?

Nourhe Khate: The violin is such an expressive instrument with a very wide dynamic range and flexibility. I don’t think any other instruments apart from the voice can imitate and express human emotions the way the violin family can. I love that about the violin.

The violin is generally ranked as the most difficult instrument to master. As my most beloved teacher uncle R. Kevichüsa usually says, every single note you’re able to play on the violin is an achievement. It takes sheer practice to be able to play a seemingly simple note because the violin doesn’t have frets like the guitar or pre-tuned notes like the piano. It involves precise muscle memory. But it is also one of the most rewarding instruments once you learn it.

 

Eastern Mirror: You are also a member of the band Papersky. Have you had more appearances as a band or as a solo artist?

Nourhe Khate: Yes I am. As of now, I’ve done more solo performances, but at this rate, the band will beat my solo record soon.

 

Eastern Mirror: What is it like being a guitarist in a band?

Nourhe Khate: It is like a lonely orphan finding a loving family who embraces him/her and understands his/her form of expression and complements what is lacking. It is nice to be a solo artist, but then the feeling of going up on stage knowing that you have people who got your back is priceless.

 

Eastern Mirror: From your social media updates it is obvious that you have equal passion for violin and guitar. Which did you pick first- violin or guitar?

Nourhe Khate: Yes I do have equal passion for both although I am not formally trained in guitar.

I picked up the violin first.

 

Eastern Mirror: As a guitarist how do you work around your lead singer’s ever changing vocal style and find the right balance live?

Nourhe Khate: Music making is like a conversation between two or more people. In order to communicate and make sense, you need to be speaking in the same language, the same topic, while being sensitive to each other by giving space for each person to express themselves. The same is true with us while working on balancing our parts. These are skills which we develop over time. Music is a language, and just like how babies learn to speak by listening to their parents speak, we learn best by listening to songs/musical pieces to get encultured and expand our musical vocabulary.

 

Eastern Mirror: You have collaborated with a roster of artists. How does satisfaction differ for you from concert appearances and collaborations?

Nourhe Khate: The satisfaction that I get from playing with my musical family is always fulfilling and leaves me feeling content, but collaboration is like the breath of fresh air that inspires and motivates me in ways I never knew existed. Sometimes you never know what you need till you actually try it. For an artist to be an artist, having an adventurous spirit is vital for growth. Monotony subtly kills.

 

Eastern Mirror: What has been the highlight of your career so far?

Nourhe Khate: The four main highlights of my career so far would have to be

: Winning the David Menezes National Violin Competition in 2014

: Being awarded the Rumi Foundation Great Indian Scholarship, Great Indian Scholar & Leverhulme Arts scholar to complete my Masters in Violin Performance from Trinity Laban Conservatoire of Music, London.

: Playing at the wedding celebration of Nisha Ambani and Anand Piramal with sir Nise’s group.

: Winning the Reliance Trends Project Play: Battle of the Bands 2019 with my band Papersky.

I have come a long way from where I started and I am so grateful to God for intricately designing all the divine connections that has brought me thus far. So glory belongs to Him.

 

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