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Rhythm of Love: In conversation with Tokaholi Chishi

By   /  February 14, 2019  /  Comments Off on Rhythm of Love: In conversation with Tokaholi Chishi

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Meet Tokaholi Chishi from Dimapur who not only sings but is an aspiring writer as well. Chishi describes herself to be a ‘bedroom singer’ who loves to tell stories and write poems. |

She believes that words are more powerful when merged with melody, and that a simple honest song can lift the burden off a heavy soul.

Her song ‘Await,’ is about a season of self-discovery and a gentle reminder to all the singles to go on an adventure to making the most of their alone time, collecting stories and memories.

Rhythm of Love today gets insights from the artist who has bigger dreams to fulfil. Read an exclusive poem of hers too!

Read on…..

 

‘The Black Sheep’-

Momma never really liked me.

My fleece was brown,

My heart burned black.

Grazed on the green grass every evening;

Laid down on my belly,

Watched clouds twirl in the blue.

Met a Shepherd in the twinkling;

His eyes shone like a moonstone,

Gaze of a star sapphire.

He called me ‘Beautiful’

Words that pierced my gist.

Bent down to place me on His shoulders,

Whispered, “I call you my Zerah, I’ve brought you in scarlet.”

Proud and unashamed to be seen with a black sheep,

Like the wooden cross He carried when I was asleep.

He climbed down the mountain to a place we would now call home.

Tokaholi Chishi

 

 

Tokaholi Chishi

Eastern Mirror: How would you introduce yourself to those who haven’t heard of you yet?

Tokaholi Chishi: Hello! My name is Tokaholi Chishi, an aspiring singer/songwriter. I am also currently pursuing my Masters in English Lit. at IUN.

 

Eastern Mirror:  When did you realise music was something that you wanted for life?

Tokaholi Chishi: When I realised that words were more powerful when merged with melody and a simple honest song  could lift the burden on a heavy soul, I wanted it for life. That in singing my story, I was involuntarily shaping other stories as well.

 

Eastern Mirror:  Apart from singing do you have any other artistic interests?

Tokaholi Chishi: I love to write poetry, short stories, and enjoy story telling. I am interested in pursuing these fields of art as well.

 

Eastern Mirror: What is your song ‘Await’ all about?

Tokaholi Chishi: I wrote the song ‘Await’ in a season of self-discovery, as young people we sometimes lose ourselves in wrong relationships and forget who we are meant to be. My youth pastor once said “It’s Heaven when you are with the right person”. I began to ponder on that thought and said to myself, “I’d rather wait another ten years than to be with someone who is not right for me.” So this song is a gentle reminder to all the singles to go an adventure of making the most of their alone-time, collecting stories and memories. In due time we get to share all those secrets with someone who has also been on a journey and be individually happy enough to begin a new one.

 

Eastern Mirror: Your inspirations?

Tokaholi Chishi: I have always been inspired by the Parables of Jesus- colourful, peculiar and full of wisdom. They are my muse for songwriting. I look up-to songwriters Josh Garrels and John Mark McMillan who infuse their faith with poetry and creative music. Jason Upton, his art of story telling. They are original, honest, illustrative and life changing.

 

Eastern Mirror: Top 5 tracks that you cannot live without.

Tokaholi Chishi: A very difficult question so I will attempt to share the ‘current’ tracks I cannot live without-

  1. Losing My Religion by Lauren Daigle
  2. Woman by Mumford and Sons
  3. Watch Me Dance (Cover) by Linthoi -Jam Tree Ensemble
  4. Raise a Hallelujah by Bethel
  5. Magic Mirror by John Mark McMillan

 

Eastern Mirror: Where do you see yourself 10 years from now?

Tokaholi Chishi: I see myself (hopefully) still making music and putting out more materials, having published a book, serving young people and (possibly) doing a tour. Financially stable and fulfilling God’s calling.

 

Eastern Mirror: What has been your biggest challenge in life so far?

Tokaholi Chishi: My biggest challenge in life so far is in learning to be the bigger person. When I am tempted to start behaving in an unethical manner I always remember what a man of God once said, “The tree with the most fruits gets the most stones”. It encourages me to keep pressing on. Another challenge is juggling music and education, trying to find the right balance.

 

Eastern Mirror: Favourite quote.

Tokaholi Chishi: Not really a quote but a question that paves the way to all my favorite quotes-

“What makes your heart sing?”

-Steve Jobs

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