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Rhythm of Love: In conversation with Samuel Konyak

By   /  January 5, 2017  /  Comments Off on Rhythm of Love: In conversation with Samuel Konyak

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Samuel Koaviary-photo_131168795367661469nyak from Mon Town is an upcoming artist of the state whose songs are mostly focussed on social and political issues happening in the present society.
A participant at Naga Idol 2007, Samuel is also the vocalist of the band ‘Toxic Peace’ a progressive Folk Fusion Rock Band from the town.
Crediting the 80’s and 90’s Rock music for his influence, Samuel Konyak says many young talented youths are growing in the state of which he is proud of but laments saying market is the problem and questions..Where do we sell our music?
Mention may be made that Samuel h
as written numerous of originals for his band ‘Toxic Peace’.

EASTERN MIRROR: Most of your influences are bands that are primarily known for being artsy and progressive. How does that translate into folk fusion for you?
Samuel Konyak: Mmmm… Well I’m very fortunate to have grown up listening to Music… 80’s, 90’s Rock music was a big influence in my music world…(smile)Every Band or an Artist have their own identity or style of Music. Down the years. I have been performing in different places and stages but the demand for Originality and the Band/ Artist Unique identity of Music became a much prior importance as a Musician. So, the risk and composing mixed music with an addition of our simple folk tune gave a new form/ style of music, and that’s how the fusion developed…(hahaha)

EASTERN MIRROR: From being a Naga Idol participant to fronting a rock band, have you faced difficulties in the transition from being a mainstream music enthusiast to something more progressive as folk rock music?
Samuel Konyak: Honestly, Naga Idol was an important part of my Musical Journey. The stage gave me the opportunity to show my talent and also to earn love, support and respect from all good people. The transition period was one of the hardest period in my life… A challenge I took up and now I’m happy that it was frsam1uitful. Obviously, I faced difficulties and obstacles from singing only covers, but thank God for His guidance, now I can write and compose my Originals…

EASTERN MIRROR: What, according to you, does Nagaland lack in her music industry?
Samuel Konyak: I may be right or wrong here but just to share my thought on this… aaa..I feel that in Nagaland, music as an Industry has not yet found its form as of now. Today we see a lot of talented youcapture05-01-2017_073757_pmhs booming in the field of music and that’s one thing I’m proud about my State Nagaland. But where do we sell our music?… Market is the problem.. Well, on this I would request and encourage each one of us to support our local artists…

EASTERN MIRROR: The making of your debut solo “Christmas wish” in two lines.
Samuel Konyak: Hahaha…. Ya, though an Artist, we hardly think of composing a Christmas gaana… Well my ‘Christmas wish’ is a simple song, wishing all love, peace and joy in this festive time and most importantly for those people who couldn’t make it home for Christmas…

EASTERN MIRROR: There aren’t that many bands from Mon. What is it about Toxic Peace that you believe can offer something new to capture the attention of music fans in the state?
Samuel Konyak: Ya, not a number of bands from Mon.. My Band ‘Toxic Peace’ is a progressive Rock Fusion Band. We love to experiment with our expression and at the same time, throw in some traditional touches. We write about social and political issues relevant to our society. Musically, a typical Toxic peace song has surprises within the song. We have played a couple of shows outside and the respond was good and people really liked our song….

EASTERN MIRROR: What do you wish that bands in Nagaland could have were they given a choice?
Samuel Konyak: My wish is,,(sight) the ability and channel to market our Music.

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